About APRA

Apra Awards FAQs

Where can I view all of Apra's past Award recipients?

You can see the list of the past award recipients here.

How can I apply for a scholarship/grant?

Visit the About Apra/Apra Awards page where you will find information about all of Apra's offerings. 2017 applications will be available in January.

Who should/can apply for an Apra Award?

For most awards, any Apra member in good standing who believes she or he exhibits the qualifications that the award is seeking to honor, can apply for an Apra award. An Apra membership is not required for the Scholarship award. The scope, purpose and requirements of each award are described on the Apra Awards page. If a nomination for an award is made by someone other than the intended recipient, it is recommended that the nominee involve the person nominated in the application process.

What qualities make a good candidate for each award?

  • Apra Scholarship: Applicants for an Apra scholarship spend at least 50% of their time working in advancement research for a nonprofit (not as a consultant). Financial need (working for a nonprofit with a limited or no training budget) is a factor in this award. The Scholarship includes a 15-month membership, so membership is not required of applicants.
  • Apra Distinguished Service Award: Applicants or nominees for the Distinguished Service Award have demonstrated significant contributions to Apra and its members through their work in their chapter or the organization as a whole. Distinguished Service awardees have served in leadership roles on Apra committees and boards or have a deep and significant volunteer history with other nonprofits. You must be an Apra member to apply for this award.
  • Apra Professional of the Year Award: The Professional of the Year is an Apra member who has demonstrated numerous contributions through their creative or unique role in developing their nonprofit's capacity to fulfill its mission. Applicants for this award are performing at a level beyond their daily responsibilities to accomplish these goals.
  • Apra Margaret Fuhry Award: This award honors Margaret's memory by annually recognizing an Apra volunteer. Applicants for the Margaret Fuhry Award must demonstrate a commitment to the profession of prospect development through leadership, mentorship and volunteerism. Applicants must have volunteered within two years of the submission due date and must be an Apra member.
  • Apra Visionary Award: The Visionary Award is periodically given to an Apra member who has demonstrated leadership to Apra members through their lifetime of work. The award is given by the Apra board. There is no application process or nomination procedure for this award.

How does the rubric function?

The Apra Awards Committee, with the guidance of the Apra board, created a consistent standard for evaluating award candidates. The committee members consider each element to evaluate how well a candidate meets the requirements for award recipients.

What if I haven't done the things you are asking about (volunteered, etc.). Should I apply anyway?

If you have not yet had a chance to engage in your research or nonprofit community, you may want to construct a plan to do so and apply for an award in the future. Awards are intended to recognize service and involvement as well as support candidates demonstrating financial need through their nonprofit's limited training resources. The candidates who demonstrate these characteristics are the ones most likely to advance in the process.

I have volunteer experience, but it's outside of Apra. Should I tell you about it?

Yes, you should share that with the committee. Your experience in leadership roles with other organizations and your own nonprofit are valuable in viewing you as a viable candidate. The committee will not know what you've done unless you share it!

I do not live near a chapter, so I can't get any credit for being a chapter volunteer. Do you have any suggestions on how to improve my standing?

There are ways to volunteer in your profession or your community that could help your standing as an award candidate. Are you able to help other nonprofits who want to learn about prospect development? Have you considered writing an article for Apra Connections or another publication? Are there other professional groups in your area who might benefit from your expertise as a researcher or your skills as a volunteer for their activities? Is there a chapter in a neighboring state that could use your talents in planning meetings or other tasks? Remember, many volunteer roles can now occur from a distance.

Who are the best people to ask for recommendations?

Ask someone who knows you and your work well. A close colleague, manager, or someone with whom you've worked in your chapter activities will know you well enough to make a strong recommendation. Encourage the person you pick to write about your contributions.

Do I have to attend the conference to get an award?

For the most part, the awards are designed to help Apra members attend the annual conference, so award recipients should be in attendance.

Can you please clarify financial need and what constitutes it? How can I still illustrate it in my application if it is not a priority within my organization's budget?

Financial need is best expressed by outlining the resources your department has for training. The specifics you share can make this clear to the committee and are appreciated, but budget dollar figures are not required. Applicants for awards where financial need is a consideration can share information about their nonprofit's ability to send them to the annual conference. (For example: "Our training budget was reduced and now allows for local conferences only," or "We have four researchers and our budget permits only one researcher to attend a conference," or "My department has no training budget.")